Rolex demand children’s clock startup change name in trademark dispute

Rolex demand children’s clock startup change name in trademark dispute

With its colourful numbers and hands helpfully labelled minute and hour, a children’s learning clock from Oyster & Pop, a family firm in Devon, is sold online for about £20. A Rolex Oyster watch, on the other hand, calls itself a “superlative chronometer” and costs nearer £5,000.

Rolex is demanding that the smaller company change its name, however, arguing that people might think the Teignmouth children’s clocks have something to do with the Swiss watchmaker.

Oyster & Pop, which also sells wall charts, fraction sets and highlighters, was set up in 2021 by Emma Ross-McNairn and her sister Sarah Davies. The company is named after Oyster Bend in Torbay, where they grew up.

Lawyers for Rolex, which is based in Geneva, wrote to Oyster & Pop in early January to demand they rebrand. Rolex claims it is a similar name to its Oyster Perpetual line of watches.

The company says that the “average, reasonably well-informed consumer” would probably call the Rolex line of watches to mind when looking at the Oyster & Pop logo.

The letter added: “Consumers will inevitably be misled into thinking that your products emanate from Rolex.”

As a result the lawyers have demanded the firm change … Read More

Twitter hit by 40% revenue drop amid ad squeeze after Musk takeover

Twitter hit by 40% revenue drop amid ad squeeze after Musk takeover

Twitter remains in the grip of an advertising squeeze, with the social media platform hit by a 40% drop in revenue after more than 500 clients paused their spending, according to reports.

The company’s daily revenue was down 40% year-over-year, the tech newsletter the Platformer reported, while the news site the Information said staff were told more than 500 of Twitter’s top advertisers had halted spending since Elon Musk bought it in October.

Advertising is the main source of income for Twitter, accounting for more than 90% of its $5.1bn in revenue in 2021, but clients including Audi and Pfizer are among the firms that have paused after the Tesla CEO’s $44bn (£35bn) takeover.

Concerns about an increase in hate speech on the platform after its acquisition by a self-described “free speech absolutist” have prompted advertisers to withdraw in droves. They have also been alarmed by a spate of impersonator accounts that flourished on the site after a botched relaunch of its blue tick scheme for verified users.

Giving more detail on the 40% figure, the Information reported that a senior Twitter manager had told staff on Tuesday that the revenue for that day was 40% lower than the same … Read More

Seed capital funding launches for UK entrepreneurs in colour or dyeing industries

Seed capital funding launches for UK entrepreneurs in colour or dyeing industries

The Dyers’ Company has launched a new Seed Capital Investment Fund designed to support innovation in, and the commercialisation of, business ideas with a link to colour or colouration.

The Dyers’ will consider initial investments of up to £25,000 per venture for fledgling businesses and entrepreneurs seeking to transform their innovative ideas into successful businesses.

The initiative is relevant to a vast range of industries/activities with a connection to colour and colouration including colour chemistry and science, food technology, healthcare (e.g. medical dyes), engineering, sustainable dyeing, textiles production for fashion and interiors and much more.

Over time it is hoped that this fund will enhance the economic impact of colouration in the UK by the creation and ongoing support of new businesses, providing vital resources and mentoring for colour and colouration practitioners from across industries.

Traditionally the Dyers’ Company has supported academics and students in their field with grants, bursaries, and prizes – this initiative is designed to extend that support to individuals who may be looking for ways to take the next step in their lives and careers.

Russell Vaizey, Clerk of the Dyers’ Company states: “Historically, the Dyers’ Company was at the heart of supporting apprenticeships and training, … Read More

13 million Brits are using credit cards to pay for everyday essentials such as travelling to work

13 million Brits are using credit cards to pay for everyday essentials such as travelling to work

As credit card borrowing soared to £1.2 billion in November, the highest levels since 2004, new research reveals one in four consumers – the equivalent of 13 million Brits – are relying on credit to fund everyday costs such as lunch and transport.

Almost three in 10 Brits are using it to feed themselves and their families.

With some household’s income no longer sufficient to cover monthly outgoings, one fifth of the nation are also using borrowed money to keep the lights on and pay their household bills.

Reliance on credit varied across UK regions. For example, over a third of residents in Southampton are using credit cards to pay for essential expenses, like transport costs. While almost one in three in Belfast are relying on plastic to pay for household bills, such as gas and electricity.

As reliance on credit cards grows, data shows consumers are beginning to use them at a younger age. The average person over 55 signed up to their first credit card at the age of 32. This compares to age 23 for the average 18-34-year-old – a whopping nine years difference.

Despite the marked upward trend in credit card usage, many are still unaware … Read More

Navigating high inflation and rising energy costs: Strategies for small business success

Navigating high inflation and rising energy costs: Strategies for small business success

Small businesses are pivotal in reviving the UK economy, and they play a vital role in creating jobs and driving economic growth. However, high inflation and rising energy costs can present significant challenges for small businesses.

These challenges can make it difficult for businesses to maintain profitability and continue to operate successfully. In this blog post, we’ll explore some strategies that small businesses can use to mitigate the impact of high inflation and rising energy costs and continue to thrive.

One strategy small businesses can use to deal with high inflation is to review their pricing and consider raising prices on goods or services.

By increasing prices, businesses can offset the cost of inflation and maintain profitability.

However, it’s important to consider the impact on customers and the competitiveness of the market before implementing any price changes. For example, a small coffee shop could raise the prices of their coffee by 10% and still remain competitive by offering high-quality coffee beans and a good atmosphere.

Another strategy is to focus on cost-cutting measures and increasing efficiency. This can include reducing energy costs by implementing energy-efficient practices or negotiating better rates with energy suppliers.

For example, a small retail business could … Read More